Sunday, May 30, 2010

Plein Air Workshop May 30, 2010

Just got back from a wonderful day of painting, sun and meeting new friends. Today I took my first plein air workshop with George Perdue (www.georgeperdue.com) out at R.A. Gallery near Shelburne. What an amazing experience!

R.A. Gallery offered us the use of their many acres of property, their pond and old barn ruins to paint. We all rose to the challenge. Which is not to say that I will be posting my paintings. Well, maybe one, but I will post a few photos once I download them.

George is a patient instructor and a wealth of information. I have admired his work since moving to Orangeville 5 years ago when I saw a painting of his hanging in Mochaberry. A screen door with a view to a kitchen. I was in love. Having the opportunity to paint with him was the icing on the cake! He was very encouraging and plans to invite us all out to paint again one day.

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Head Stuffed with Fluff meets with Perfectionism

My last three weeks have been spent fighting a horrible cold then sinus infection. Today I have the pleasure (?) of watching my fourteen-year-old with it. The feeling of having nothing in your head but pillow stuffing is not helpful to writing or painting. The ideas get lost somewhere among all the fibers and come out as garbled words.

Thankfully, I am feeling better and able to tolerate him being bored out of his head and not able to focus on one thing for longer than thirty-three and a half seconds. I am also able to write again. I was finding it easier to use a pen and paper rather than my computer since it was easier on the eyes.

I have found that there is a very different connection to your work when you do not do it via electronics. My mind, heart and hand make a better team when they have a firm grip on a pen and I can scratch the ink onto paper. The click of the keyboard is satisfying too, but not in the same way. There seems to be a greater need for perfection on a computer - especially since it can auto-correct mistakes.

I don't want to be corrected when I am busy putting thoughts to the page.
I don't want to be told I'm wrong for each pen or finger stroke.
As artist and writers, we deal enough with our inner critic on a daily basis. Why do we have to listen to it when the ideas flow and thoughts are being spewed forth?

For one day, turn off your critic - as well as your spell check - and let the thoughts wander where they may. You might be surprised.